Ubuntu training for educators

On the weekend I ran a short training session for teachers about Ubuntu. It was a lot of fun, and surprisingly most of the teachers had never played with Ubuntu before. Usually at these kinds of events, the people who turn up to the Linux/Ubuntu session are the hard core converted, so that was lovely!

We spoke about a lot of stuff, but unfortunately, even though I mentioned the need to be online, the people running the day hadn’t put two and two together (booting from a livecd and asking to be online) and they didn’t know their proxy details to get online, so the session was slightly less interactive than I would have liked. I wanted to have the online Ubuntu repository available so we could install and play with ome specific applications. Anyway, below are some useful links for the people who attended, and for anyone else interested.

The meaning of “Ubuntu”:

Ubuntu is an African word meaning ‘Humanity to others’, or ‘I am what I am because of who we all are’. The Ubuntu distribution brings the spirit of Ubuntu to the software world.

Information about Ubuntu:

Information about Open Source generally:

Make sure you join the edulists open source mailing list to connect with other teachers using and talking about Open Source in education. Join the list and introduce yourself :)

Have fun everyone! If you have additional links that would be helpful, please add them to the comments.

This entry was posted in Aus Community, education, FOSS. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Ubuntu training for educators

  1. Michael Carden says:

    Chris is stoked that you linked makethemove in your URL list. He’s keen to find people to help him update the site both factually and in a look and feel way. So if you know anyone who likes mtm and would like to help, please put them in touch with me or with Chris.

  2. AlphaG says:

    Considering there are over 2000 spoken languages in Africa, how can Ubuntu be an “African” word surely you can narrow it down a little as 1999 other language speakers may not understand you

  3. jdub says:

    It’s actually a fairly common word across many of the languages (and certainly the concept is well understood, even if the word itself is not part of the vocabulary), particularly middle to south of the continent. Consider, however, the relevance of the information to the audience, rather than the precise etymology.

    But it must be asked: Do you ever post non whiny-little-maggot comments? Always the whinge about Windows or pointing out some minor quibble. At least bring humour to your pedantry, or go away and spend your time more productively/wisely.

  4. AlphaG says:

    I am confused on whose blog this is, does it really represent Pia or Jeff or are you so melded you are one in the same.

    Actually I guess I am bringing balance where there isn’t any. For example the Iceland blog previously is completely irrelevant and I suspect completely wrong but that of course doesn’t stop the few painting a picture that is very different from the truth. But being able to retransmitt a falacy still doesn’t make it reality, I will stop whining now and return to my corpse that we maggots enjoy so much

  5. greebo says:

    Hi AlphaG, the Iceland blog was me reposting someone else’s blog which I found interesting.. Thank you for the followup comments about how it isn’t relevant to Australia, but that makes it no less relevant there.

    This is certainly my blog, or are you suggesting that Jeff can’t comment on my blog? :) Thank you for your questions, but please try to keep your comments constructive. My quote about the Ubuntu word was from the Ubuntu site, you are always welcome to direct any questions about it to them :)

  6. greebo says:

    @jdub, please refrain from these kinds of comments on my blog, I don’t like the tone they set. Thanks :)

  7. Rachel says:

    I saw an ad on ESPN for the XO laptops. Just thought I’d say well done to all involved for making them so public.

  8. gEEgEE says:

    Ubuntu 8.10 – no sound at all

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>